Thursday, May 26, 2022

Artists [by relative’s work].

It is not uncommon for people to have similar professions to their relatives. This is especially true for musicians and athletes, for whom there is a statistical correlation. As one would expect, there are a great many people who have artists as parents, and in many cases the influence of their parents’ work can be seen.

 

However, even if your relatives are not artists, they can indirectly influence your creation. Sometimes they can be a source of motifs and inspiration. Often, they can be a catalyst for aspiring artists. So much so that the occupation of close relatives is an important part of an artist’s creative process.

 

In this article, I would like to explore the relationship between these relatives’ occupations and their works side by side.

 

Father: Trading company employee

 

Saori Kanda

 

When Kanda was a child, she spent time in Baghdad (Iraq) and Dubai (UAE) due to her father’s work as a trading company employee. While living in foreign lands, she was exposed to the beauty of the world and the charm of Japan.

 

 She calls herself a “dancing painter,” and her art performance is based on the idea of painting by feeling the waves of music with her whole body. The body itself becomes a part of the painting and dances across the big screen. The brushstrokes that the artist creates dynamically have a life-like vitality, and are born and then disappear. Their cycle is like an ecosystem.

 

 The work with physical expression is connected to the action painting lineage of Kazuo Shiraga and Jackson Pollock, but the performance that fills the space with lighting, music, dance, incense, costumes, hair and makeup, stage art, etc. is highly regarded as a unique performing art and is registered as a World Heritage/Okinawa It is also registered as a World Heritage Site/Okinawa Nakagusuku Site. She has also given dedication dance performances at Amagawadai-Benzai-Ten Shrine in Nara, Kibitsuhiko Shrine in Okayama, and in Taiwan, Shanghai, and Hong Kong. USA, Switzerland, France, Kazakhstan, India, Myanmar, Philippines, etc. She has also been invited to Japan.

 

 Her travels around the world, absorbing the encounters with the people there, and energetically presenting her works as a dancer and painter, transcend the boundaries of country and race, but we can assume that her upbringing is closely related to her original experiences.

 

 

Click here to see more of Kanda’s paintings.

 

https://www.tricera.net/artist/8100114

 

Father: Blacksmith

 

Hiroko Tokunaga

 

 The presence of a blacksmith, a form of “monozukuri,” in her childhood seems to have shaped Tokunaga’s unique attitude toward creation. When she was in college, she majored in oil painting, but after exploring the possibility of expressing herself through “making things” rather than “painting,” she found a way to carve out acrylic sheets. This is as far as she has gotten. Her current work has a contemporary “high” vibe to it, but at the same time it is more than art. In addition, it gives us a sense of a more fundamental act: making things.

 

 Maybe it’s because I know her parents are blacksmiths, but I can’t help but feel that blacksmiths and Tokunaga’s works and creations have something in common. From a distance, her works look very modern and neat, but at the same time, they seem impersonal and even cold. They are like iron products that have just been forged and finished by a blacksmith.

 

 However, the cut out dots and lines have a different look when viewed up close. The work is incredibly delicate, yet one can see the traces of human skill with certainty. The warmth of these works seems to reflect the spirit of craftsmanship inherent in the family business of blacksmithing, which has been passed down from generation to generation. There is. By looking at the “accumulation” of dots and lines, the viewer “perceives” all the sensations of her transition from art to “making things,” and the “connection” of dots and lines acquired through this transition, which she experienced in her brush “accumulation” during her college days.

 

 

Click here for other works by Hiroko Tokunaga

 

https://www.tricera.net/artist/8100373

 

Sister: Apparel businessman

 

Shimpei Ishikawa

 

 Ishikawa’s older sister was a fashion student, so fashion magazines were close at hand when she was an adolescent. The models she saw on the magazine runways were symmetrical. Artistic models must have tugged at Ishikawa’s heartstrings as an artist. After that, the model-like figure began to appear in his motifs, and even now, Ishikawa’s interest in models is high. This is connected to the basis of his work, which is to “feel and imagine.

 

 He often covers the model’s face and body with clothes to transform it into a form different from the original human body. This has been done. The artificial act of putting on clothes transforms them into “made” parts, like dolls. However, the legs used to walk the runway are, so to speak, part of the original human form, “made or unmade. The coexistence of these two elements shakes the viewer’s vague yet vivid sense of “feeling and imagining. The coexistence of these two parts shakes the viewer’s vague but vivid sense of “feeling and imagination. Because of the “made” part, there is a kind of blankness in the “made or unknown” part. In this way, we, the viewers of the models, are encouraged to use our imagination.

 

 Ishikawa reproduces exactly the same thing in his work. The artificially manipulated form of the work and the unconscious image of the viewer coexist and interact with each other. His works, which are completed by doing, are by their nature like a creative process. He creates his works on the premise that there is a person inside, deliberately leaving room for the viewer’s imagination. He holds a hand. The viewer is consciously aware of the “made” part of the work with the hand and the “made or unknown” part of the work without the hand. The interactional relationship with the work is bounded by back and forth. Not only that, but it will make us reconsider what consciousness is.

 

For Ishikawa, the act of carving a person from blocks of wood and the structure of a clothed person are natural elements in his work. It is a knot, a seemingly strange act for us. However, the mental function of “feeling and creating” may be hidden in our daily lives, in fashion models and in unexpected ways.

 

 

Click here for more works by Shimpei Ishikawa

 

https://www.tricera.net/artist/8100381

artclipAdminhttps://www.tricera.net/
私たちART CLIPは、世界中の最新のアートニュースを取り上げ、アーティストやコレクターの人々の活動にとってより有益な情報を発信していきます。

Most Popular

You Might Like

Words of flowers, paintings of flowers – about paintings that depict the meaning of things

 Many cultures around the world have a tradition of using plants to carry symbolic meanings.  People give bouquets of flowers to congratulate people when they...

Reviews of Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2019

An exhibition showing current trends in contemporary art in Japan.     From June 5 to 20, the 13th edition of Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2019, one...

What is art in the age of traveling to the stars?

The history of constellations dates back to about 5,000 years ago. They are said to have been created by Mesopotamian shepherds who connected the...

The Shape of Time – Group show by Takumi Saito, Samehoshi, Manami Azuma, Kanaewu Hayashi, Azusa Nozawa –

TRiCERA is pleased to announce a group show of multiple works by five artists: Takumi Saito, Samehoshi, Manami Azuma, Kanae Taku Hayashi, and Azusa...

How will a “system where you can buy artworks for as little as 100 yen” change the world? Straym’s game-changing approach to art

About this article: ・"STRAYM" is a split-ownership art service that provides "art you can buy from 100 yen" ・"A world where anyone can buy...

Don't Miss

What is the meaning of “painting” left in our time – Interview with Manami Azuma

Using beautiful girl figures and toys as motifs, Manami Azuma traps time on canvas through the movement of rotation. Combining the simple and classic...

A lenticular limited edition print by Kosuke Motohashi was released in a limited edition of 150 copies.

THE KING OF SILENCE   15,000 yen (excluding tax)   Edition:150 Size:H420 × W297mm Technique:Lenticular print on acrylic lens Framed Original acrylic frame (+ ¥10,000) The frame in the...

Eye-catching works with content and painting methods

Maria Farrar "Too late to turn back now" OTA FINE ARTS Installation view of "Too late to turn back now" (2019) by Maria...

Painting by Spinning: Three Artists Using Textiles

Incorporating the organic textures of textiles can sometimes bring to the work the historical context of clothing in which fibers have played a...

Feature Post

Varda Caivano’s solo exhibition at Tomio Koyama Gallery

Varda Caivano, "Untitled", 2019, water-based oil paint (gouache and ink) on linen, 90.9 x 57.6 cm (frame: 150.9 x 117.6 cm), ©Varda Caivano,...

A lenticular limited edition print by Kosuke Motohashi was released in a limited edition of 150 copies.

THE KING OF SILENCE   15,000 yen (excluding tax)   Edition:150 Size:H420 × W297mm Technique:Lenticular print on acrylic lens Framed Original acrylic frame (+ ¥10,000) The frame in the...

The Distance Between the Work and the Artist’s Heart: On the Appeal of Drawings

 The words used to describe art are enormous and the boundaries of definition are unclear.  Drawing and its surrounding words may be a particularly clear...

Reviews of Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2019

An exhibition showing current trends in contemporary art in Japan.     From June 5 to 20, the 13th edition of Art Award Tokyo Marunouchi 2019, one...

Editor's Choice