Friday, June 18, 2021
Home Others ART & TIPS - From framing to storage

ART & TIPS – From framing to storage

I want to buy some art, but I don’t know how to frame it.
I want to buy art, but I don’t know how to frame it, or I’ve bought art, but I don’t know how to store it.
This article will explain what you don’t know about buying and keeping art.


How to live with art - from framing to restoration

Actually, I just bought a piece of art. And for the first time!

Oh, that's nice. What kind of work did you buy?

It's a drawing, and the gallery staff asked me, "It's not framed. I was at a loss for a moment. I was confused for a moment. "Well... What's framed? I thought.

I guess that's true when it's your first time.

That's right. But to begin with, some paintings are framed and some are not. What's the difference?

The main difference is in the artwork.
Some paintings are on canvas, some on wooden panels, and some on paper. That's why they put them in frames to make them easier to hang.

Oh, so you also frame photographs and prints because they are paper?

Yes, in many cases. There are different types of frames, some with frames, and some that are just acrylic or glass frames.
If you ask the shop where you bought the work, "I want to frame this work, do you have any recommendations? I'm sure they will be able to guide you.

Acrylic frame

The drawing I bought is on paper, so it's better to frame it. How exactly do you "hang it on the wall? My mother said, "If it's paper, why don't you just hang it on the wall? But I'm not so sure about that.

There are many ways to do this, such as attaching a metal bracket to the wall, or using a device called a picture rail. I don't recommend attaching it directly to the wall, as it may damage the work.

Well... What do you mean by attaching hardware or equipment? Do you have to make a hole in the wall...? We're renting, so I'm a little concerned... I'm afraid the landlord will say, "Restore the original! I'm afraid the landlord will say, "Restore it!

There is a way to avoid damaging the wall by using a special rubber compound, called "sticking insects", but you can learn more about it at an art supply store or home center.

I see. But what should I do if I don't want to display them? Is it okay to store them in a closet?

Some artworks don't like humidity, so you have to be careful. Paper is particularly sensitive to humidity and is not very durable. Humidity, temperature, sunlight, and insect infestation are not limited to paper, but they are all energy sources that need to be considered when storing artworks. In general, it's better to put a wooden floor underneath and keep it out of the sun as much as possible. If it's paper, put it in a box.

Hmm. Can't you keep them at a warehouse or something?

Of course a warehouse is possible. But you have to check if they specialize in art. It's important to check if they specialize in art. You should also check if they have moisture and insect proofing. The rest is up to you and your wallet.

Even so, there are times when they get damaged. Kids bumping into things, earthquakes.... I have a lot of parties at home, so I have a lot of people over.

There are also restorers, people who specialize in repairing artworks. But first, you should ask the gallery where you bought the work or the artist. The artist and the gallery know the work best.

To buy a million yen painting - Is it possible to pay in installments? No? -

I just bought a painting, but I actually want to buy a second one...

I see signs of the "collection disease. I've just bought my first one, and now I want another one. What do you want?

I want an oil painting...

That's nice.

It's a million yen, but...

... I see.

To be honest, I can't pay in a lump sum right away. Then save up! But it's a one-of-a-kind item, and it might be sold, right? So I'm not sure what to do. Is it possible to pay in installments?

It depends on the gallery, but in some cases it is possible. In most cases, the gallery will hold the work for you until you finish paying. Why don't you ask the gallery first?

Won't they think I'm being a little bit naughty?

It happens all the time, and I appreciate the feeling of "I can't pay right away. I think it's great that you can't pay right away, but you still want it. So let's ask them first.

Can I sell the work I bought? Or not? -

For example, what do people do when they feel they want to give away their work?

You mean, "How do I sell my work?

Yes, sir... Is it still wrong?

There are many ways of thinking about whether it's good or bad to sell your work once you've bought it, and the answer depends on who you ask. But that doesn't mean you can't do it. It's more like, "Oh, you don't want it? I want it! It might be a good thing to put it in the hands of someone who will think, "Oh, you don't want it?

I see.

By the way, "buying and selling works that have already been bought" is called "second -hand". On the other hand, "buying directly from the artist or gallery" is called primary.

In other words, is it used or new?

... Well, it's similar, but it's not the same as clothing or electronics.

But you can "sell your work" itself, can't you?

There are many ways to do it, such as putting it up for auction, or talking to the gallery where you bought it. I think the best thing to do is to ask the gallery where you bought it.

What kind of auctions are there? Not just any kind, right...?

Auctions that specialize in art are probably the best. Christie's, Sotheby's, and Phillips are the most famous, but there are also SBI Art Auction and Shinwa Auction in Japan.

That's the one that sold Basquiat, isn't it?

That was Sotheby's New York, right? That's Sotheby's New York, the home of the real thing, like Major League Baseball.

Is it possible to sell to a place like that?

Well, it's not that easy. The best thing to do is to ask the gallery where you bought the work. The gallery should be able to help you when you buy, keep, or sell your work.


At TRiCERA, you can easily purchase artworks created by artists from all over the world.
If you don't like what you see, you can return it.
Why don't you try to incorporate art into your daily life?

If you have added a work to your wishlist Click here Please check them out.

Shinzo Okuokahttps://www.tricera.net/
Born in 1992 in Tokyo, Japan. After studying Indian philosophy at university, she worked at a publishing company as a deputy editor of an art magazine and a shrine magazine, where she was involved in planning and editing magazines and books. 2019 she joined TRiCERA, a start-up company, where she was in charge of developing Japan's first cross-border e-commerce site specializing in contemporary art, managing artists, and launching the company's own on-demand media. He is also in charge of developing Japan's first cross-border e-commerce site specializing in contemporary art, managing artists, and launching the company's own owned media. He is a fast writer, and when he was working for a magazine, he was able to write 150 pages in a month by himself.

Most Popular

You Might Like

Hiroki Takeda: Inhabiting the World of Animals in Vivid Watercolors

I fell in love with the beauty of watercolors, and since then I have been trying to create colors that only I can create.   Hiroki...

Ginza Yanagi Gallery: A beacon for Western-style painting in Tokyo

Stepping into the Ginza Yanagi Gallery The Inclusive Mission of the Owner of Ginza Yanagi Gallery Strengthen the artistic reputation of Japan Where...

TRiCERA artists appear on Japanese TV program “Pre-Breakthrough”.

There are over 100 artists participating in the TRiCERA service, some of whom were featured in the Japanese TV show "Break Senya" called "The...

Asian artists on the rise, Asian art power explodes at Hong Kong Art Week

Meeting at Art Basel in Hong Kong   Starting with a private viewing for the press and VIP guests, Art Basel Hong Kong was held from...

Why You Should Buy Japanese Art” compared to other Asian art market statistics.

The Great Value of Japanese Art as Seen from a Comparison of Statistics in the Global Art Market The art market in Japan, which boasts...

Don't Miss

Words of flowers, paintings of flowers – about paintings that depict the meaning of things

 Many cultures around the world have a tradition of using plants to carry symbolic meanings.  People give bouquets of flowers to congratulate people when they...

Put the art next to the pillow.

It is up to you to decide where to place the art in your home. It can be on the wall, on a shelf...

Depicting the beauty of the human form. What is the history and modernity of beauty painting?

A bijinga is a painting that depicts a beautiful woman's appearance and gestures, or a painting that deals with the beauty of women. The...

Izumi Kato’s work at a unique art space in Tokyo

Izumi Kato's solo exhibition "LIKE A ROLLING SNOWBALL" at Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo     Izumi Kato, a world-renowned Japanese artist based in Tokyo and...

Feature Post

Bringing Light into Form – Interview with Shinji Fujino

 He has had numerous exhibitions in Japan and participated in an artist-in-residence program in Slovenia in 2019. In 2019, he participated in an artist-in-residence...

Eye-catching works with content and painting methods

Maria Farrar "Too late to turn back now" OTA FINE ARTS Installation view of "Too late to turn back now" (2019) by Maria...

What is the fun of collecting?

Neng, a veterinarian, just recently purchased a piece of art by his new favorite artist. He shared with us his experience of meeting and...

Eternal creative energy, a key force in being an artist

Ohira Susumu's solo exhibition (2019) by Ohira Susumu at Gallery Hinoki.     One of TRiCERA's featured artists, Ohira Susumu, is holding a solo exhibition at Gallery...

Editor's Choice