Saturday, June 19, 2021
Home Curator’s Eye "I want to paint a new picture."

“I want to paint a new picture.”

Self-taught artist Kosuke Kato is one of those young people who are passionate about studying and researching art history and the contemporary art scene. His works are created by decomposing the visual information in a scene and transforming it into geometric shapes, using the landscape as a reference. He is interested in the story behind the painting and the process of its creation, and always keeps in mind the proposition “what is painting in the first place?”, demonstrating an attitude of pushing the boundaries of painting. First of all, please tell us about your paintings. The motif of my work is landscape. I don’t just paint landscapes, I break down the visual information and replace it with geometric patterns. I am inspired by Laura Owens. The reason I started painting landscapes is because I wanted to paint big. The larger the object, the better it is to represent the entire world of the object. Also, landscapes have a lot of information and are easy to decompose for reintegration. Nojima, 91×91cm Were you painting landscapes from the beginning? No, at first I was painting a combination of realism and minimalism, I started painting when I was 23 years old, and my style was very simple, I thought that realism paintings would sell quite well, so if I combined them with the Japanese culture of wabi-sabi, they would sell. However, as I was exploring different things, I thought it would be better to create something in a form that I liked, so I started studying the history and scenes of contemporary art. I went to a lot of museums in Tokyo and read books on art to gain knowledge, and around 2019 I started painting landscapes in my own style. What is important to you when you create your work, is it the context of art or your own thoughts and feelings? I think to create something new you need to know the tradition and history, so I focus more on the tradition. I think that knowing the old style helps me to create a new style of painting. I want to be a painter and at the same time I want to be in the context of creating new paintings. snowscape, 194×162cm How do you think about newness? Newness may not be the right word, but I think cubism is interesting. Cubism is abstract, but I think its essential purpose is the reintegration of images. In that sense, I think it’s similar to the way I paint, but maybe I’m working with different images. Why did you decide to become an artist in the first place? I liked drawing, but I didn’t think I had any special talent, nor did I receive any praise from others. It all started when my art teacher in high school showed me a lot of art books. One of the books was on Jackson Pollock, and I was very impressed. My curiosity about what painting was all about was my starting point. Awkward Tree, 91×117cm What are your future plans? I started a series of landscapes in 2019, which reaffirmed that my focus is on the process of making. I’m interested in painting what painting is and what it tells us about the history of painting. Another important aspect is contemporaneity. Nowadays, everyone searches for everything on the Internet. I think it would be interesting to pull images from social media and include them in my paintings. I would like to continue to pursue painting while incorporating the good aspects of the current age.

artclipAdminhttps://www.tricera.net/
私たちART CLIPは、世界中の最新のアートニュースを取り上げ、アーティストやコレクターの人々の活動にとってより有益な情報を発信していきます。

Most Popular

You Might Like

TRiCERA artists appear on Japanese TV program “Pre-Breakthrough”.

There are over 100 artists participating in the TRiCERA service, some of whom were featured in the Japanese TV show "Break Senya" called "The...

Is the digital a synonym for the real? Naoya Hirata’s vision of a new “place” for sculpture.

The works of Naoya Hirata, created by assemblaging materials collected from the Internet in a virtual space, are, according to him, "sculptures. He...

Katsuso Ichino: Taking a Step from Tradition to Contemporary Art

"I want to make use of the simple and natural clay that is unique to Tanba-yaki." Katsuiso Ichino Mr. Katsuso Ichino is the seventh...

A.C.D – Metamorphosis of Color

A.C.D explores the use of color and shape to create a visual narrative in her paintings. she has been working as an artist since...

Eye-catching works with content and painting methods

Maria Farrar "Too late to turn back now" OTA FINE ARTS Installation view of "Too late to turn back now" (2019) by Maria...

Don't Miss

Modern “Death” in the Skull

 "Memento mori". In Latin, it is a warning phrase meaning "think of death" or "remember that you are going to die.  Although it has been...

How is craft influencing contemporary painting?

My goal is to transcend time," says Kohei Kyomori, who decorates his paintings with ornaments and craftsmanship. We spoke with him about his thoughts...

In Search of Undefined Truth; Abstract Painting at Home – Part 1

As an Imaginary Being Have you ever looked up at the sky with a telescope to discover the mysteries of the universe? Just...

Review of the exhibition at Yutaka Kikutake Gallery, “In Need of a Nail

Installation View, Nerhol 'For want of a nail', 2019 ©️Nerhol Photo: Shintaro Yamanaka (Qsyum!) Courtesy of Yutaka Kikutake Gallery From June 6 to...

Feature Post

Summer Scenery in Art 2020 – Summer Greeting Part 2

The last week of August is the most sentimental days of summer for many people. For children, it's the end of summer vacation, college...

3 Minute News – Where the next artist is coming from

The Sompo Japan Museum of Art, located in Shinjuku, was established in 1976. It is one of Tokyo's leading art museums, holding five...

Fingertips, paper, and the artist.-The Paper Art Story part 2

Click here for more information about my work. If you haven't read part 1 of the Paper Art series, which explains the uniqueness...

Exhibition to Support Passionate Young Artists in Tokyo

The 21st "1_WALL" Graphics Exhibition Installation View, "The 21st "1_WALL" Graphics Exhibition", 2019 ©️Guardian Garden Courtesy of Guardian Garden. Young artists are always...

Editor's Choice