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How will a “system where you can buy artworks for as little as 100 yen” change the world? Straym’s game-changing approach to art

About this article:
・”STRAYM” is a split-ownership art service that provides “art you can buy from 100 yen”
・”A world where anyone can buy art”, “Activating the art The mission of SMADONA is “to create a world where anyone can buy art”, “to revitalize the art market”, and “to return profits to artists at the time of resale”.
・The team members are specialists in advertising, securities, and technology.

 

 

SMADONA Corporation has announced that it will officially launch STRAYM, a platform based on the concept of “art that can be purchased for as little as 100 yen,” at the end of 2020.

 

 The company launched the service in December 2019 with CEO Mikihiro Nagasaki, who has worked in advertising and other creative industries. The company, whose members include artist Hiro Sugiyama and other professionals in securities and web system development, has two main issues in mind.
・”Art buyers are skewed toward a few wealthy individuals”
・”The Japanese art market is not growing fast enough”
As a solution to this problem, the company proposes, develops, and operates “split ownership of art,” which has been appearing in Japan and overseas in recent years.

 

 

 

 

What are its features?
Inevitably, artworks by artists with high name value that cost more than one million yen will be sold to buyers with incomes commensurate with the price (unless they go into debt). However, one of the company’s concerns is that if the art is distributed only among a few people, the people who evaluate it will also become an oligopoly.

 

The feature of “STRAYM” is that it does not sell the work itself, but the ownership rights attached to the work, and builds a system that allows multiple people to purchase the rights for as little as 100 yen. The system is unique in that it allows multiple people to purchase the work for as little as 100 yen. The aim is to solve the above problem by allowing people other than the “wealthy” to purchase the work.

 

 

Increasing the number of artworks that can be purchased for a small amount of money will inevitably lead to an increase in the number of buyers and the expansion of the market itself. This is the solution to the other issue of STRAYM, which is to revitalize the market.

 

On the other hand, a further issue that the service aims to solve is the return of profits to artists at the time of resale. In developed countries such as the U.S., China, Switzerland, and Japan, except for Western countries, there is currently no legal guarantee for the return of profits to artists at the time of resale at auctions. The STRAYM service is designed to provide a mechanism to return a percentage of the profits generated from the resale of ownership rights to the artists, thereby ensuring equality in redistribution. The idea is to make artists who have been marginalized in the resale process a party to this.

 

 

The company is aiming for an official launch in 2020, with the milestones of making the service available as an app and in English in 2009, and establishing an overseas base in 2010.
STRAYM’s game-changing approach to “how to buy art” may drastically change the picture of who is involved in art with the economy at its core.

 

Reference URL: https://fundinno.com/projects/131

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